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Challenge to reduce plastic use this July

29/08/2019 | 苏州美甲美睫培训 | Permalink

TrishHaeusler twirls a standard ballpoint pen in her hand.
Nanjing Night Net

“This pen will outlive me,” she says.

Not necessarily its usage or purpose, but its imprint on the earth.

Made of hard plastic, it could be 500 years before it has broken down.

For 20 years, the Launceston woman has noticed the growing prevalence and normality of plastic in everyday societal transactions.

As a teacher with an interest in environmental science, she’s walked students along beaches that are littered with discarded plastic.

This July, she wants people to think more about their plastic consumption, for Plastic Free July.

Ms Haeusler said it was not about overhauling one’s way of life, but taking small steps to reduce their plastic consumption.

“During July, we’re going to try and give people little tips,” Ms Haeusler said, who started the Facebook page Plastic Free Launceston.

“It’s about taking responsibility for all these plastics that you buy.

“When you buy something now, you think, ‘Where will this end up? This is going to be about much longer than me’.”

She said an easy place to start was with the big four: plastic bags, plastic straws, coffee cups, and bottled water.

It’s estimated that Australia uses 6.9 billion plastic bags each year, and about half of those are plastic shopping bags.

And they may seem small and inconsequential, but more than 10 million plastic straws are thought to be used in Australia every day.

The debate around reusable coffee cups has been hot lately, and not out of the blue –Australians use one billion a day.

And despite our level of drinkable tap water, Australians bought more than 726 million litres of bottled water in 2015.

So how do we tackle the “big four”?

It was as simple, she said, as saying no, or asking for an alternative.

“It’s about showing people that there is an alternative,” Ms Haeusler said.

“When you buy something, make it known that ‘I’m interested in buy this, but could you sell it to me like this?’, or just maybe going without.”

She’s been spreading the message throughout the community, running workshops in schools, and talking to businesses.

“Talking to businesses, that’s been really interesting,” she said, and added that part of the program was instilling a positive approach, rather than a guilt-inducing or shaming technique.

She said that, once again, it came down to making people pause to think if the plastic they’re about to take on is completely necessary.

“[I’m talking to businesses about] how about during July, rather than automatically doing something, wait for (the customer) to ask for a straw, or plastic bag,” Ms Haeusler said.

“Or, just say that you’re trying to cut back, and ‘Would you prefer not to have a bag or straw?’.

“It’s about changing behaviour.

“There’s this belief that you can’t live without plastic bags, when people did for a long time.”

Trish Haeusler, Plastic Free Launceston

Ms Haeusler said the recentWar on Wasteseries onABChad prompted more people to think about the after-life of their rubbish.

When it comes to reducing the use of the “big four” single-use plastics, Ms Haeusler said the alternatives were obvious and easy.

Bring your own bag to the supermarket, or so no to a single-use plastic bag if offered.

Say no to the plastic straw when ordering a drink.

Invest in a keep cup, and take it to your local caffeine haunt.

The same goes for bottled water –invest in your own hardy water bottle, and take it with you.

Ms Haeusler said that once people started to think about the amount of plastic they use once, twice and throw away, they were startled at their usage.

“It’s not about making life harder, but just have a look at what you’re using daily, and just see if there are a few things you can replace,” she said.

“We can get people to be confident to say ‘I can’t buy that’ or ‘Can I have that in a paper bag?’.”

She encouraged people to talk to friends, family, and colleagues about their plastic use, and easy ways that it could be reduced.

“C’mon, how about we give this a try?,” is the tried-and-true line she recommends.

Plastic Free Launceston will kick off the month with an event at Harvest Market in Launceston on Saturday.“I feel like I’m constantly reliving this terror every night, and no matter what I can’t find a way to calm myself down.

The Examiner

Victims question Act protection for teen criminals

29/08/2019 | 苏州美甲美睫培训 | Permalink

RELIGIOUSLY securing windows, locking doors and spiralling into fits of panic hasbecome commonplacefor Wagga’s Kirra Bloom.
Nanjing Night Net

The 43-year-oldhas spoken ofher ongoing terror, diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after an aggravated break and enter last year.

She joined a growing tally of property crime victims who have suffered severe psychological distress after losing their sense of security.

Ms Bloom has shared her harrowing experience in an attempt to show magistrates the wide-reaching repercussions of home invasions.

“The worst thing is that I feel stupid because it wasn’t something extremely serious like a war,” she said.

“I feel like I’m constantly reliving this terror every night, and no matter what I can’t find a way to calm myself down.

“I’m suffering from insomnia and every night I wake up at least four to five times to go downstairs and make sure the doors and windows are all secured.”

It comes as the controversialYoung Offenders Act, which protects teen criminals from exposure to the justice system, has increasingly come under fire in recent weeks.

“Magistrates seem more concerned about the welfare of the offenders than the victims,” Ms Bloom said.

The leniency of custodial sentences and bail approvals made airwaves across the state on Thursday when a Wagga woman penned an emotional letter to radio presenter Ray Hadley.

She told of the catastrophicseries of events that led to the death of her elderly mother.

“My parents were the alleged victims of a 16-year-old, bailed after numerous alleged break and enter offences,” she said.

“It was the beginning of a very devastating chain of events for our family.

“The alleged break-in emotionally affected my dad, the main carer of my mum who had Alzheimer’s.

“Two weeks after the break in my mum fell ill with an infection.

“Because my dad was so rattled by the break-in he didn’t notice.

“She passed away on April 1, 2017.”

Heranecdote sent the accomplished broadcaster into a fury.

“The Magistrate’s obviously had no thoughts for the victims when he gave this kid bail,” Mr Hadley said.

“A break-in indirectly results in a death and no one cares.

“It’s disgraceful.”

The Daily Advertiser

Uber passengers to pay an extra $1 for every trip

29/08/2019 | 苏州美甲美睫培训 | Permalink

Uber passengers will be slugged with a $1 fee for every trip as part of landmark reforms regulating ride-share services in Victoria.
Nanjing Night Net

The reforms passed the upper house on Friday following a last-minute amendment introduced by Sex Party MP Fiona Patten to slash the per trip levy from $2.

The levy will apply to all taxi, Uber and other commercial passenger vehicles. Photo: Ryan Stuart

The levy will apply to all taxi, Uber and other commercial passenger vehicles, with the money to be used for an industry transition fund.

The government also agreed to remove a $50 million cap for the fund.

The levy, which will be applied on a per trip basis, will replace annual licence costs, which can cost tens of thousands of dollars.

Public Transport Minister Jacinta Allan said this would cut costs, increase competition and drive down fares for passengers.

“This legislation will regulate ride-sharing, cut fares and provide the most generous industry transition and support package for the existing taxi and hire car industry in Australia,” she said.

The reforms leave room for the levy to be hiked if the revenue is not enough to cover the costs of financial assistance provided to the taxi industry.

Under Labor’s proposed reforms taxi licence holders would receive up to $100,000 for their first licence and $50,000 for their second, third and fourth licences.

On Saturday, Uber Victoria managerLucas Groeneveld​welcomed the move, saying it would benefit everyone.

“Fiona Patten introduced sensible amendments to move reform forward for the benefit of the travelling public and the industry as a whole,” Mr Groeneveld said.

“We’re pleased the Legislative Council has accepted the amendments and trust the government will pass the bill when Parliament resumes.”

Opposition police spokesmanDavid Hodgett​ said the government voted for increased taxes on all Victorians.

“Daniel Andrews decided to target regional Victorians by voting to slug regional commuters for their taxi and Uber rides,” Mr Hodgett said.

The Age

After 50 years, legal access planned for lost Waterfall cemetery

29/08/2019 | 苏州美甲美睫培训 | Permalink

After 50 years, legal access planned for lost Waterfall cemetery One of the few intact headstones at the Waterfall General Cemetery, which will be legally accessible after decades under a new council plan. Picture: Christoper Chan
Nanjing Night Net

One of the intact headstones at the rediscovered Garrawarra Cemetery. Picture: Christopher Chan

Sixteen-year-old Vincent Arena died on February 4, 1926. He is pictured with his family.

Garrawarra Cemetery, north-west of Helensburgh. Picture: Christopher Chan

Thomas Kennedy, with his wife Lydia Kennedy, died at the Waterfall Sanatorium on September 15, 1923, and is buried in Garrawarra Cemetery.

Thomas Kennedy died at the Waterfall Sanatorium on September 15, 1923, and is buried in Garrawarra Cemetery.

Thomas Kennedy died at the Waterfall Sanatorium on September 15, 1923, and is buried in Garrawarra Cemetery.

Garrawarra Cemetery, north-west of Helensburgh. Picture: Christopher Chan

Sisters Josephine Minister (pictured) and Gertrude French both died at Garrawarra and were buried in the cemetery. Since the cemetery was rediscovered, Josephine’s great-granddaughter Jody Faraone, from the Gold Coast, has discovered her family’s Aboriginal ancestry.

Sisters Josephine Minister and Gertrude French (pictured) both died at Garrawarra and were buried in the cemetery. Since the cemetery was rediscovered, Josephine’s great-granddaughter Jody Faraone, from the Gold Coast, has discovered her family’s Aboriginal ancestry.

Garrawarra Cemetery, north-west of Helensburgh. Picture: Christopher Chan

Garrawarra Cemetery, north-west of Helensburgh. Picture: Christopher Chan

Garrawarra Cemetery, north-west of Helensburgh. Picture: Christopher Chan

Garrawarra Cemetery, north-west of Helensburgh. Picture: Christopher Chan

Garrawarra Cemetery, north-west of Helensburgh. Picture: Christopher Chan

Garrawarra Cemetery, north-west of Helensburgh. Picture: Christopher Chan

Garrawarra Cemetery, north-west of Helensburgh. Picture: Christopher Chan

Florence Louisa Brennan, born 1893.

Bernard Patrick Murray with son Francis.

William Eaton.

TweetFacebookFor fifty years, access to the graves of 2000people who died at NSW’s only state-run tuberculosis sanatorium has been forbidden.

But, under a new plan to be debated on Monday night, Wollongong City Council will pave the way for legal access to thelong-lost Waterfall cemetery.

Read more: Forgotten souls of Garrawarra Cemetery

Located south the old sanatorium(now theGarrawarra aged care facility),the isolated 110-year-old burial groundhas been under the council’s care since 1967, but was only rediscovered in 2011. Since then, efforts have been made to restore its place in the city’s history.

The council is hoping to acquire “right of carriageway” over an old road that runs off the Princes Highway, at Helensburgh, so that people who want to visit the graves do not have to crossDepartment of Health and Crown Lands.

“Council is responsible for the management of the Waterfall (Garrawarra) Cemetery and currently no legal access to it exists,” a report to councillors said.

To remedy this, and eliminate the need for people to cross into Department of Health land near the aged care centre, Crown Lands has suggested the council acquire a fire trail and apply to the NSW Treasurer to waive any compensation fees.

The fire trail currently does not have access to the Princes Highway, the council said, and this would need to be constructed.

Illawarra Mercury

Hardship policies should be a standard rule

29/08/2019 | 苏州美甲美睫培训 | Permalink

Credit card statements, water, phone and energy bills, mortgage repayments, council ratesand exorbitant rental fees.
Nanjing Night Net

Cr Loretta Baker.

How can low-income householders possibly get ahead?

Maitland councillor Loretta Baker’s quest to promote council’s ratehardship policy could not have come at a better time.

Introduced in 2014, Cr Baker said the not so widely known policy wasthere to help Maitland’s battlers and was implemented to help householders cope with the urban rate rise.

The council pushed ahead with plans in December 2013 to increase rateswith a unanimous vote but one of the provisos was to review the debt recovery and hardship policy.

The average urban land rates were set to climbfrom $986 to $1796 in 2020-21, based on an average land value of $148,000, if the independent pricing and regulatory tribunal should decide to uphold the increase.

Areport found the proposed urban rate rise would be 1.1 per cent of total household expenditure in 2020-21 and up to 2.52 per cent of the annual budget of people on government support.

Under the debt recovery and hardship policy council will issue a reminder letter if rates are not paid within seven days of the due date.The reminder notice will advise that the recovery of the rates and charges may be referred to council’s debt collection agency if the overdue amount is not paid in full within seven days.

At the end of that seven days council will refer all assessments where the amount overdue is greater than $450 to its debt collection agency, unless the ratepayer makes alternative arrangements.

Cr Baker is encouraging residents struggling to pay rates to ring council and start a payment plan.Shesaid increasing energy charges, rents and the high cost of living in general hadmany families struggling to make ends meet.She said this coupled with no wage growth was cripplinglow-income householders.

Fairfax Media brought you the story last week of Mother Moira Evers who has started a program in her parish to feed the less fortunate including some families who live in cars.She’s finding it hard to keep up with the demand.

People are struggling and helpful incentives like Maitland Council’s hardship policy should be standard acrossall service providers.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.